The PhoneBoy Blog


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Comcast Updating Their Usage Caps

From: Comcast to Replace Usage Cap With Improved Data Usage Management Approaches

So as the market and technology have evolved, we’ve decided to change our approach and replace our static 250 GB usage threshold with more flexible data usage management approaches that benefit consumers and support innovation and that will continue to ensure that all of our customers enjoy the best possible Internet experience over our high-speed data service.

In the next few months, therefore, we are going to trial improved data usage management approaches comparable to plans that others in the market are using that will provide customers with more choice and flexibility than our current policy. We’ll be piloting at least two approaches in different markets, and we’ll provide additional details on these trials as they launch. But we can give everyone an overview today.
The first new approach will offer multi-tier usage allowances that incrementally increase usage allotments for each tier of high-speed data service from the current threshold. Thus, we’d start with a 300 GB usage allotment for our Internet Essentials, Economy, and Performance Tiers, and then we would have increasing data allotments for each successive tier of high speed data service (e.g., Blast and Extreme). The very few customers who use more data at each tier can buy additional gigabytes in increments/blocks (e.g., $10 for 50 GB).

The second new approach will increase our data usage thresholds for all tiers to 300 GB per month and also offer additional gigabytes in increments/blocks (e.g., $10 per 50 GB).

In both approaches, we’ll be increasing the initial data usage threshold for our customers from today’s 250 GB per month to at least 300 GB per month.

I have to give Comcast some credit for this. Looking at increasing the cap–because, let’s face it, we’re all using the Internet more and more–and making those who actually use more bandwidth pay for it. The “overage” is even somewhat reasonable, unlike the overage you pay on your typical data plan for your mobile phone ($10 gets you one gigabyte instead of fifty).

Of course, I don’t give Comcast any credit for exempting their own traffic from bandwidth caps. Can’t say I’m surprised about that.

 

Too bad the mobile phone companies won’t offer pricing anywher


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